News

News

They share any information that’s available concerning our business or things that might affect our business. And I think they also are very effective in helping you understand why you need to look at things differently if you’re not looking at them the right way.
- Tanya Henry, Executive Director, Milwaukee Careers Cooperative

 

We are constantly on the alert for all the latest industry news, legislative updates, trends and more that could possibly impact your staffing business. Our president and CEO, Julie Ann Blazei, also shares her insights on the staffing industry in her message (link below). And when we don’t see information about a topic we feel is critical for you to know, we create it ourselves to share in our monthly email.

Press Room

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I spoke with a staffing company owner the other day who thought she was getting a great rate that couldn’t be beat.

“Shelly, I’m only paying a .067% daily rate with my current provider. I’m really comfortable with that rate.”

 
 
 

Click HERE to listen to a radio interview with Shelly Wilkinson, Director of Sales/Marketing for Tricom Funding.

By Julie Ann Blazei
 
Finding the right funding provider can seem like a daunting task. There are many to choose from, but not all offer the same services or pricing structures.
 
Funding providers offer two types of relationships: Full Service, which includes funding as well as administrative services, or Funding Only. There’s a major pricing pitfall that can impact both types of relationships—it’s important to be aware of the potential traps unique to each.
 

Full Service

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Legislative Updates

 
"Like many other states, Wisconsin’s Unemployment Insurance (UI) Reserve Fund had to rely on federal loans to help fund unemployment benefits paid to record numbers of claimants during and following the deep national recession of 2007-09.
 
The federal government began charging states interest on these loans in 2011, and Wisconsin in September 2011 made its first payment, totaling $42.3 million, with funds collected through a special assessment on employers.
 
 
It’s only half as much as the increase this year, but Ohio’s minimum wage will get a boost on Jan. 1, 2013. The minimum wage will rise 15 cents, to $7.85 an hour, in the new year, the Ohio Department of Commerce announced yesterday. For tipped employees, the new minimum will be $3.93 per hour, an increase of 8 cents an hour.
 
 
Washington state’s minimum wage increases by 15 cents to $9.19 an hour starting on New Year’s Day, the state Department of Labor & Industries announced Friday.
 
The state’s minimum wage is adjusted each year for inflation as measured by the Consumer Price Index over the preceding 12 months. This past year, it is up 1.67 percent. The yearly recalculation is required by Initiative 688, which Washington voters passed in 1998.
 

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